Category: Our Generation

Managing the Move Home

Despite all of the articles that come out calling Gen Y’ers “boomerang kids” and insisting that we flock to our parent’s houses in droves, we know the truth:  we really don’t want to return to the nest.  In fact, we’re usually hell-bent on not doing so…even when heading home might be in our best interest.

If it looks as if you will be homeward bound, relax. Although there will be some bumpy moments, anyone can navigate their time at home if you maintain a clear focus.  In 2008,  I moved back in with my Dad in Tennessee.   At times it was an exercise in patience. But looking back, I think I benefited a lot. It was a difficult time for me professionally (didn’t know what the heck I wanted to do), so it was great to have the support of my family and friends as I searched for purpose in my life.

If it looks like moving back in with your parents might be in your future, fear not.  Keep these three things in mind:

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Push the Limits: How eliminating certain beliefs can help you move forward

On Friday I shared an exercise that had you examining the things you love and hate about your life. Today, I want to shed light on something that may be behind the things on your hate list: your own limiting beliefs.

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How to Trust Your Vision, Even When Others Don’t

When I made the decision to blog about living life against the status quo, I knew I would receive some feedback that would be less than positive. In fact, I had my fair share of warnings.  Every blogger that writes about lifestyle design has said that when you try to encourage people to think outside the box, some people will freak out. Then they will speak out. And sometimes what they have to say will be pretty nasty.

Well, this weekend I received some criticism about this blog that wasn’t nasty, but it still took me by surprise. One of my friends (who is a great, delightful person) said she thought the pace of my writing is slow, and that the blog reads more like a letter than a blog.  I’m always open to feedback, so I took her comments in stride. In fact, I’m glad she said what she did.

Because now I get to write this post about the three things I think you should remember when people start questioning your vision.  *Drum roll, please*

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Dream Rehab

Have you ever had one of those days when you felt like your dreams were so out of reach, that it hurts you to remember them?  Maybe you have had one of those moments when you can’t quite figure out how you got to where you are now, and exactly where you should go from here?

These moments sneak up on me sometimes, kinda like a bad cold. And although you can say you never saw the sniffles coming, at some point (usually during your third box of Kleenex), you think back and realize the warning signs were there. It’s the same way with dream deferment. At some point you saw yourself slipping, but by the time you decided to  re-up your preventative measures, it’s too late. You are breaking your back trying to catch the dreams you feel are slipping away.

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Finding the Value in Your Skills

A few days ago, I was blog surfing when I stumbled across a post that made me do some thinking out loud.

The majority of this person’s post was about changing job descriptions in the work place.  The author expressed his sentiment that sometimes your job can include more tasks than the job description outlined, perhaps even some duties you really didn’t bargain for. Now, we all know this happens. And sometimes it provides an opportunity skills that you can use later you to leverage your way into a new position. That is thinking smart.

However; this person went on to say that you need to do whatever your company tells you to do because you should be grateful that you have a job.  As a worker bee, you should haul ass to help the company pull through in these (wait for it, I’m about insert a buzz phrase here) “tough economic times” because it is not only your duty to save yourself, you must save the company too.

The same company that probably wouldn’t have a problem tossing you out on your hinny cheeks when times get rough.

Which brings up the question: when does getting more experience start to turn into the company getting over on you? We all know that sometimes we have to do things that are not officially in our job description, yes. But at what point are you being undervalued and well, cheated?

Outside of robbing us of a sense of security, I believe this recession has also robbed some people of their personal moral. Getting laid off hurts. Searching for months to find a job hurts. In the midst of it all, it is natural to start to question your skills, but at some point you have to lift yourself up.  And most importantly, I think you have to remember that you have options. They might be harder to find, but options are out there.

Sometimes we do have to work at jobs we don’t want to do to make money. Believe me, I get that (remind me to tell you all about my temp jobs!), but at some point you have to value yourself and your skills. The company should be happy to have YOU. Yes, times are tough right now, but that doesn’t mean you need to put up with being ill-treated, right?

What do you think?  How are you reminding yourself that your skills are valuable?