Category: Resources

What To Do When You Don’t Feel Like Writing A Damn Thing

 

There will be those days when you look at your blog, and with a quickness, you shut that tab DOWN. You walk away from your computer, look at it sideways, and find recluse in whatever distracting task you can possibly get your hands on as quick as possible.

Yes, you’ve set goals. Yes, you feel as if your readers are virtually giving you the side eye, because the only thing jumping on your site these days is crickets, but you don’t care about any of that because dagnabbit, you just don’t feel like writing a damn thing.

I feel you my sisters (and brothers). There have been many times when I didn’t feel like writing. Didn’t even want to THINK about writing, and I’d be lying if I said I forced myself to do it anyway.  In most cases I didn’t.

But in the good name of all that is delightful, and the shit parade that is about to become a barrage of “New Years Resolution” themed-posts, I wanted you to be prepared.

Introducing, my tips for what to do when you don’t feel like writing a damn thing.

Read more

The Art Of The Focused Hustle

Back in the day, people kept their side hustle a secret. In fact, the word “hustle”  seemed to be a bad word that was reserved for select groups of people (usually with a negative connotation). Now, everyone has a side gig.

Hustling has become the new black.

No doubt, the effed up economy had something to do with the hustle coming in vogue. Gone are the days when you could kick back and dream about your ultimate job while slaving away at your 9-5. Burning the midnight oil on your side gig has become the norm.

Now it is way more acceptable to:

1. Let people know you have a gig on the side (Everyone is a potential customer!)
2. End convo’s with your friend by saying, “Go on girl! Get your hustle on!”
3. Expect everyone to tell you they are a chef/massue/ writer/martial artist

The last point is what I want to hit on. We live in a slash culture. People are rambling off 5 or more things that they are doing, but unless your name is Diddy (which means you really have a ton of other people doing the heavy lifting for your anyways)  it is impossible for you to give all of your best time and effort to five different things.

Read more

Don’t Be Afraid To F* Up

Most people (myself included) got the message in elementary school that making mistakes is a bad thing. We were taught to memorize facts and figures, and that only bad things come out of making mistakes (bad grades, failure in life, ect).

But this wasn’t always the case.

In fact, during our formative years, our parents encouraged us to make mistakes galore! We fell down many times before we learned to walk and we made garbled sounds before we said anything audible. We tried, and failed until one day we succeeded.

The fear of making mistakes paralyzes us into living lives that look nothing like the ones we have imagined for ourselves in our heads. It’s at best, a shoddy representation of the desires we have in our heart. We plug away at things we don’t care about because we are afraid that if we go after what we really want, we will fall flat on our face. No one likes falling in public.

But the beauty of life is in the mistakes that we make. Because mistakes are lessons waiting to be learned, and harvested, and turned into a better model of what we were trying to achieve before we fell short.

Read more

Stop Seeking Approval to Live the Life You Want

 

The list of complaints about Generation Y is miles long.  We are lazy. We’re entitled brats who don’t know what it means to work hard for a buck. We’re whiny. We’ve heard it all before.

But we know the truth.

What they don’t know is that  more than anything we want to look like we have life all figured out. We want to look like we are mastering our universe. Monday through Friday, many of us pimp ourselves out in button-down shirts and polyester pants to head to jobs that have us  living paycheck-to-paycheck because we are hesitant to admit we are scared.

We aren’t afraid of getting our lights cut off. Making credit card payments late is unpleasant, but we don’t fear that.  We aren’t terrified of eating MSG-ladden Ramen Noodles for a few more years.

Nope. What are we most afraid of?

Disapproval.

Read more

Finding the Value in Your Skills

A few days ago, I was blog surfing when I stumbled across a post that made me do some thinking out loud.

The majority of this person’s post was about changing job descriptions in the work place.  The author expressed his sentiment that sometimes your job can include more tasks than the job description outlined, perhaps even some duties you really didn’t bargain for. Now, we all know this happens. And sometimes it provides an opportunity skills that you can use later you to leverage your way into a new position. That is thinking smart.

However; this person went on to say that you need to do whatever your company tells you to do because you should be grateful that you have a job.  As a worker bee, you should haul ass to help the company pull through in these (wait for it, I’m about insert a buzz phrase here) “tough economic times” because it is not only your duty to save yourself, you must save the company too.

The same company that probably wouldn’t have a problem tossing you out on your hinny cheeks when times get rough.

Which brings up the question: when does getting more experience start to turn into the company getting over on you? We all know that sometimes we have to do things that are not officially in our job description, yes. But at what point are you being undervalued and well, cheated?

Outside of robbing us of a sense of security, I believe this recession has also robbed some people of their personal moral. Getting laid off hurts. Searching for months to find a job hurts. In the midst of it all, it is natural to start to question your skills, but at some point you have to lift yourself up.  And most importantly, I think you have to remember that you have options. They might be harder to find, but options are out there.

Sometimes we do have to work at jobs we don’t want to do to make money. Believe me, I get that (remind me to tell you all about my temp jobs!), but at some point you have to value yourself and your skills. The company should be happy to have YOU. Yes, times are tough right now, but that doesn’t mean you need to put up with being ill-treated, right?

What do you think?  How are you reminding yourself that your skills are valuable?